Officially, Marian Days starts on Thursday, Aug. 2, and runs through Saturday, Aug. 5, but the city will close the streets around Marian Days, including Grand Avenue, Fairview Avenue and Highland Street, starting at 7 a.m. on Saturday, July 28.

Last year, Carthage Police Chief Greg Dagnan said the church that prepared communion for the Saturday mass at Marian Days told him they prepared communion for 110,000, and that didn't include thousands who attended but did not take communion.
Last year's Marian Days was particularly special, it was the 100th anniversary of the miracle at Fatima in Portugal, but it gives some idea of how big this Catholic festival for Vietnamese families in America has become.
And it gives an idea of the kind of challenge a community like Carthage, of 15,000 people, faces as they prepare to take in those thousands of visitors for as much as a week.
Officially, Marian Days starts on Thursday, Aug. 2, and runs through Saturday, Aug. 5, but the city will close the streets around Marian Days, including Grand Avenue, Fairview Avenue and Highland Street, starting at 7 a.m. on Saturday, July 28.
Carthage Police Chief Greg Dagnan said his department spent several years moving the date to close the streets and set up road blocks back in the calendar before finally finding this sweet spot.
And it was only through cooperation between the city and the Fathers at the Congregation of the Mother of the Redeemer (a name change from the past when it was known as the Congregation of the Mother Coredemptrix) that the date to close the streets didn't have to be moved earlier.
“Honestly, if the Fathers hadn't restricted it, if they were still letting people come in whenever they wanted to, we would have had to keep backing it up,” Dagnan said. “The year they started doing that, there were people here three weeks before. They do have folks from different churches from all over the country coming to help them, so there are some folks that they allow to begin camping before Friday, those are the folks that are specifically invited to come help them. No one else can start camping before Friday. Now that they're holding to that and being strict, we can do the Saturday morning thing and it'll work for everybody.”
Dagnan said his officers will start collecting more information from campers in an effort to make things more convenient for campers and officers throughout the week.
Dagnan said, for the first time, officers will collect license plate numbers and associated phone numbers, so if a car is found in a fire lane or somewhere else where it may have to be towed from, someone can be called to move that car before the tow truck has to be called.
This will also make it easier for campers who have already been screened by officers to get back into the campground if they have to leave for some reason.