Hudson Wiggin was only three and a half months old when his older brother was killed in an accident in the family home, but that brother is still a big part of his life.

Hudson Wiggin was only three and a half months old when his older brother was killed in an accident in the family home, but that brother is still a big part of his life.
“You would think he wouldn't remember his brother, but he's still a daily part of Hudson's life,” said Chelsea Wiggin, speaking at the third annual Isaiah Wiggin Memorial Basketball Tournament on July 1. “We have a picture book of Isaiah, and he doesn't think he's any different from anyone else who has a brother. His brother's in heaven and he wants to take trips there, but it doesn't work that way even though he believes it does.”
Isaiah Wiggin was killed on July 1, 2015, two days short of his second birthday, when he was climbing on a chest of drawers and the chest fell on him before anyone in the home could react.
Chelsea Wiggin said the annual basketball tournament every July 1 allows the family to enjoy one of Isaiah's favorite activities, basketball.
His dad, Ethan Wiggin, was a standout player for the Carthage Tigers basketball team.
“We do this so we can have a day to remember him doing the thing he loved the most,” Chelsea Wiggin said. “His birthday was (July) third, so we do this tournament on the first and then on the third our family holds a birthday party, a balloon release. His brother likes cake, so we have cake for his birthday of course.”
Chelsea Wiggin said Hudson even buys his brother birthday presents that are small enough to fit inside a ballon, then the family releases the balloons, letting them float to Heaven in Hudson's mind.
“Anything that can float,” Chelsea said. “He's a lot like Isaiah. People say they look alike, I don't see it, but I think that's my coping mechanism. He talks about him on a daily basis and Isaiah's still his brother.”
The second Isaiah Wiggin Basketball Tournament, held at the Fair Acres Family Y, attracted 25 players, who formed five teams and played away a Sunday afternoon.
Chelsea said next year she'd like to see the event grow into a carnival=like event with food trucks and games for families.
She said the family is still encouraging other families with small children to anchor large pieces of furniture to walls or other sturdy structures to prevent accidents like the one that happened to Isaiah.
She said she's talking to a large furniture manufacturer about donating anchors that could be included in a package handed out to people at the event next year.
“Even if they can't afford the entry, anyone could show up to get a package of anchors,” Chelsea said. “People knowing to do that, that's still a priority. No one thinks of it, it's not something that's at the top of your mind when you go to baby-proof a house. You baby-proof what's common knowledge, you don't baby-proof the other things, the big furniture. You think at a certain age, baby-proofing doesn't matter anymore, but it does. Keeping these anchors until they are like five or six years old is really important.”

Editor's Note: This story has been changed to show the correct date of Isaiah's death and the correct number of annual tournaments held since then.