Carthage and Webb City voters who cast ballots in the August 2017 election to decide tax issues in those cities have seen how Missouri's new Voter ID law works, but for many voters in the area, the April 3 municipal election will be their first experience with this new state law.

Carthage and Webb City voters who cast ballots in the August 2017 election to decide tax issues in those cities have seen how Missouri's new Voter ID law works, but for many voters in the area, the April 3 municipal election will be their first experience with this new state law.
Jasper County Clerk Marilyn Baugh said the law requires voters to show a legally acceptable photo identification to cast a ballot, but there are three different ways people can vote so even those registered voters without ID can vote in the upcoming municipal elections.
• Option 1: Provide a Missouri issued Driver or Non-Driver license, U.S. Passport, or Military ID
• Option 2: Provide a secondary form of identification, such as a paycheck or bank statement and sign a statement confirming their identity
• Option 3: If the voter has no form of identification, but is a registered voter, they may cast a provisional ballot. If someone casts a provisional ballot, that ballot will be counted if the person returns with a photo ID or if the person's signature matches the signature in the voter registry.
Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ascroft traveled the state before the August 2016 election reassuring voters that they could still vote under the new law, even if they didn't have that government-approved ID.
He said the Voter ID law creates pathways for people who don't have identification to cast ballots and have their identification verified later.
“We've had some people that were misunderstood or they thought that, oh, I can't use my drivers license because it's expired,” Ashcroft said. “We want to make sure everyone knows, in Missouri, if you are a registered voter on election day, go to your polling place, you can vote, your vote will count. Don't be dissuaded, we want more people to come out and vote, not fewer.”
Ashcroft said Missouri's new Voter ID law became law of the land on June 1, 2017, but people seemed confused in those first elections.
Ashcroft said Missouri’s photo voter ID law also requires the state to assist voters who might not have a photo ID with the process of obtaining one free Missouri non-driver license for the purpose of voting.
He said people can call his office and get help obtaining a free non-drivers license identification, even if that requires getting a birth certificate or some other document from another state.
Contact the Secretary of State’s Office toll-free at 866-868-3245 or by email at showit2vote@sos.mo.gov and for help getting that free ID.