Many works created by the late local artist Betsy Pauly hang in private collections, where the owners can enjoy them, but they aren't seen by the public. One of Pauly's paintings is now an exception after it was given to Carthage Public Library by an anonymous donor.

Many works created by the late local artist Betsy Pauly hang in private collections, where the owners can enjoy them, but they aren't seen by the public.
One of Pauly's paintings is now an exception after it was given to Carthage Public Library by an anonymous donor.
Chuck Pauly, Betsy's widower and a partner in the Carthage law firm of Checkett & Pauly, was on hand last week to dedicate the work with Carthage Public Library Director Julie Yockey.
“It's very nice to see it here,” Chuck Pauly said. “It's a legacy and it speaks to Betsy. Betsy has a lot of pieces that are in private collections that the people who own them can enjoy them. But to have something here at the library where everyone can see it, it really meant a lot.”
Yockey said she was notified last September, during artCentral's retrospective display of a collection of works called “The Beauty of Betsy Pauly,” that an anonymous donor had purchased the painting and wanted it to go to the Library.
Yockey had to go on sick leave for a few months after surgery and she didn't see which work had been donated until January.
Shen she saw the colorful watercolor, which features an outdoor scene of flowers along a path and a white wall, Yockey said she fell in love with it before finding out it was the one that was being donated to the Library.
“It was held at artCentral for me, Alice Lynn Greenwood-Mathé kept it for me,” Yockey said. “I walked in the big front gallery there and looked around, I didn't know which one was ours and I saw this one and said, I want that one even if it's not ours. She told me that's yours.”
Chuck Pauly said his wife, who passed away in May 2016, was a self-taught artist who painted in oils before shifting to watercolors.
“This particular piece was done, I think, in 1993 and it's a watercolor with pen and ink highlights, which she would do as part of her technique,” he said. “It became her signature technique. This is one of the larger pieces, she often work in much smaller pieces.  The place they decided to hang it, here at the circulation desk, is just terrific and it's a nice long-term statement and legacy of Betsy's work and Betsy.”