The Carthage Public Library received three grants totaling more than $14,000 to support its summer reading program for young people combat the “summer slide,” the tendency for children to forget some of what they learned the previous school year during the three-month summer break.

The Carthage Public Library received three grants totaling more than $14,000 to support its summer reading program for young people combat the “summer slide,” the tendency for children to forget some of what they learned the previous school year during the three-month summer break.
Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft announced on Thursday, Jan. 25, that the Carthage Public Library has been awarded a Summer Library Program Grant of $10,872.
“Libraries are an integral part of our communities, providing Missourians an opportunity to learn and grow through the wealth of knowledge and services they offer,” Ashcroft said. “Grants like the one Carthage Public Library will receive are important to ensuring our libraries have the resources they need to provide the best services and programs to their patrons.”

Other grants
On Tuesday, the Carthage Family Literacy Council gave the Library a $1,500 grant which will also go to the summer reading program.
The Library also received $2,000 from the Library Development Foundation for the summer program.
The Library will use the money to conduct an eight-week summer reading program for all ages.
The program will include English and bilingual story times with this year’s theme “Libraries Rock!”
Carthage Library Director Julie Yockey said the summer program will be similar in scope to last year's summer program.
“It won't be any smaller that's for sure,” Yockey said. “The theme doesn't have to have anything to do with music or rock and roll, any way we can use those words will work. This money lets the Children's Library have at least three events per week, a bi-lingual event, an event for adults and an event for kids. We also have money for at least three big events, like the circus tent and the magician we had for the kickoff last summer.”

Stop the slide
The library believes that reducing the “summer slide,” the tendency for students to lose some of the achievement gains they made during the previous school year, is the most important aspect of any summer reading program and plan to keep it as the main focus.
Yockey, a former school teacher, said teachers know the summer slide is real.
“What it means to me is it's proven that kids who read through the summer are three to six months ahead of students who don't read anything all summer,” Yockey said. “As a library, we're all about reading of course, and we want to work with the schools to do anything we can to help kids keep reading through the summer.”