Carthage city leaders have given the go-ahead for a project to change the banks of Kellogg Lake and hopefully reduce the problem of stagnant water in what's known as the “rearing pond” on the east side of the lake.

Carthage city leaders have given the go-ahead for a project to change the banks of Kellogg Lake and hopefully reduce the problem of stagnant water in what's known as the “rearing pond” on the east side of the lake.
David Lawhon, chairman of the Kellogg Lake Advisory Committee, said a contractor could start as early as late this week to remove the north bank of the small pond to allow lake water to flow freely in and out of it.
The committee received a $2,500 grant from the Carthage Community Foundation to pay for the second of a three-phase project to improve the banks of the lake around this small pond.
“I can't believe it's been two years already, but in 2015 we removed a lot of brush and small trees from the banks of the rearing pond and did a major cleanup around there,” Lawhon said. “That was phase one of the project. Phase 2 is to open the pond up and connect it to the main lake so the water won't get as stagnant as it does.”
Lawhon said Peck Schrader's Excavating was the contractor chosen for the project.
The dirt and material removed from that north bank will be used to level out the other banks so they're easier for people to use for picnics and as fishing platforms.
Lawhon said the contract with Schrader will take most of the $2,500, but some money will be left over to buy and put down additional soil.
“We're only opening a 30-foot hole so we don't think the material we're removing will be enough to level the south side of the rearing pond,” Lawhon said. “We also don't want to take out some of the mature trees that are in the banks so we can't just go in and plow the dirt to make it all level without getting into some of those tree roots.”
Lawhon said a proposed phase 3 of this project will be to build a foot-bridge across the opening created on the north side to act as another fishing platform.
That will take some engineering so it will be more expensive than the first two phases, so the committee is not sure when it will get to that part of the project.
The committee would also like to put a pavilion or shelter of some kind in the area as well.
The Carthage City Council's Public Services Committee gave it's approval to the project earlier in September, and the full council unanimously approved the idea at its Sept. 14 meeting.