As Carthage and Webb City voters prepare to go to the polls on Tuesday to decide the fate of the out-of-state sales tax issue, a state official is trying to make sure voters know the new Missouri Voter ID law won't stop them from voting if they are registered.

As Carthage and Webb City voters prepare to go to the polls on Tuesday to decide the fate of the out-of-state sales tax issue, a state official is trying to make sure voters know the new Missouri Voter ID law won't stop them from voting if they are registered.
Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft was in Joplin on Wednesday pushing the message, “If you're registered, you can vote.”
He said the Voter ID law, which requires voters to present certain kinds of government-issued identification, also creates pathways for people who don't have identification to cast ballots and have their identification verified later.
“We've had some people that were misunderstood or they thought that, oh, I can't use my drivers license because it's expired,” Ashcroft said. “We want to make sure everyone knows, in Missouri, if you are a registered voter on election day, go to your polling place, you can vote, your vote will count. Don't be dissuaded, we want more people to come out and vote, not fewer.”
Ashcroft said Missouri's new Voter ID law became law of the land on June 1, but people seem confused.
Ashcroft said groups, especially in the St. Louis area, are telling people they could be turned away from the polls if they don't have a Missouri-issued drivers license, a Missouri-issued non-drivers license ID, U.S. Passport pr Military ID, one of three primary forms of identification listed in the law.
“We've actually had major media in the St. Louis area tell people they wouldn't be able to use an expired drivers license,” Ashcroft said. “I don't know about you, but I'm pretty sure an expired drivers license is a government document showing your name and address. That counts. We've had more difficulties with organizations that are putting out misleading information that would potentially confuse people, that's our biggest concern and why we've done over 100 events across the state. We're going to continue with that.”
Ashcroft said voters have three options under the new law:
• Option 1: Provide a Missouri issued Driver or Non-Driver license, U.S. Passport, or Military ID
• Option 2: Provide a secondary form of identification, such as a paycheck or bank statement and sign a statement confirming their identity
• Option 3: If the voter has no form of identification, but is a registered voter, they may cast a provisional ballot
“The neatest portion is, if you walk in and don't have any identification whatsoever, and we had three people do this in the 28th ward of the St. Louis City Aldermanic election two weeks ago, they walked in and had no ID whatsoever, and they were able to file a provisional ballot, Ashcroft said. “The local election authority was able to verify their identity based on the signature on the provisional envelope and the signature they have on record for their voter registration, just like we do for initiatives, petitions and referendums, and they were able to vote. Before this law went into affect, if you couldn't prove your identity when you wanted to vote, you didn't get to vote. Now there's a way we can say, go ahead, we'll hold that vote over here, we won't put it in the box yet, but we can verify your identity after the polls close and your vote still counts.”
Ashcroft said Missouri’s photo voter ID law also requires the state to assist voters who might not have a photo ID with the process of obtaining one free Missouri non-driver license for the purpose of voting.
He said people can call his office and get help obtaining a free non-drivers license identification, even if that requires getting a birth certificate or some other document from another state.
Contact the Secretary of State’s Office toll-free at 866-868-3245 or by email at showit2vote@sos.mo.gov and for help getting that free ID.