The second of two bridges being replaced on the east side of Carthage is taking shape and might be completed in the next two weeks.

The second of two bridges being replaced on the east side of Carthage is taking shape and might be completed in the next two weeks.
Missouri Department of Transportation Spokesman Dave Mitchell said the contractor, Clarkson Construction, from Kansas City, is “reasonably confident” workers will be able to open the new railroad viaduct on Missouri Highway 96 on Friday, July 21.
That's almost two months ahead of the contracted completion date of Sept. 15.
“We know how important that bridge and that highway are to local drivers and truck drivers in Carthage, so the contract included incentives to get the bridge done as soon as possible,” Mitchell said. “Of course this depends on the weather and there is a chance for thunderstorms the end of this week.”

Final touches
Workers were pouring concrete for the protective curbs and the wall between a five-foot sidewalk and the road last week.
Ethan McPeak, inspector watching the project for the Missouri Department of Transportation, said guardrails and lights and light standards will be installed this week.
“We're getting pretty close, it's been a good project and I hope the city of Carthage enjoys it,” McPeak said. “We had a few setbacks early with some of the substructure, some of the foundation of the bridge, but once we got that taken care of it all went really good and quick. We're just glad to be almost done.”
Clarkson Construction, could earn up to $420,000 in incentive money by finishing the project ahead of schedule.
The $6.2 million project included replacing the Spring River floodway bridge just east of this bridge. That bridge was completed and opened to traffic on June 7.
The railroad bridge is being built much wider than the 1934 bridge it replaced, with 12-foot driving lanes, 10-foot shoulders and the protected sidewalk for pedestrians.
The contractor will also install light standards and lights that match the lights installed on the inside of the Carthage Square in 2016 and the lights that are slated for installation in Central Park later this year.