The last in a series of thunderstorms that moved through Carthage on Saturday and into Sunday morning was a doozy, bringing golf-ball size and bigger hail that caused widespread damage to vehicles and windows across town.

The last in a series of thunderstorms that moved through Carthage on Saturday and into Sunday morning was a doozy, bringing golf-ball size and bigger hail that caused widespread damage to vehicles and windows across town.
The last storm of three that moved through the area hit at around 12:30 a.m. Sunday causing a swath of hail damage from Northeast Oklahoma, into south Joplin and northeast through Carthage.
Jasper County Emergency Management Director Keith Stammer said about 30 vehicles belonging to movie-goers at the Route 66 Drive In Theater were damaged, resulting in the only injury from the storm when someone was cut by shattered window glass.
That person was not hospitalized.
The National Weather Service in Springfield reports that hail ranging in size from two to two and a half inches in diameter pounded the Carthage area.
The Carthage Municipal Golf Course had, ironically, hundreds of golf-ball sized holes pounded into all the greens and throughout the course.
The course had to be closed on Sunday while crews rolled out the greens and added sand to the surface to smooth it out, removed downed limbs and leaves from throughout the course, and made other repairs.
Across the rest of the city, residents had the roofs of homes damaged, hundreds of cars across town lost windows and were dented by the ice balls.
The Carthage Public Library had damage to outdoor lights and to the Dale Memorial Gardens.
Kiddieland Park in Municipal Park had dents in the metal roofs of the new shelters over the rides. The damage was not serious enough to keep the Kiwanis Club members from welcoming riders on Sunday.
Deborah Harvey, owner of the Boots Court, said the green neon lighting, which was restored to full glory only about a year ago, was destroyed on the main building's north side.
She said the neon cost $13,000 to restore and she estimated it could cost about $6,000 to repair.
Harvey said it would be repaired, however, because it is an integral part of the Boots experience and because the federal grants they received to repair it obligate them to maintain it for a period of several years.
Harvey said it would likely take several weeks to repair because the person who fabricated it is in St. Louis and new neon tubes would have to be made to replace the broken ones.
The Carthage Water & Electric Plant's power plant reported that a little more than 1.5 inches of rain fell throughout the day on Saturday along with “plum-sized hail” during the hail storm.
The rainfall was on top of 7.25 inches that fell earlier in May and 12.53 inches that fell at the power plant in April.
It's the second big hail storm to hit the area this year.
Residents of Jasper are still repairing vehicles and homes from a hail storm that hit in late April.