Vandals damaged two landmarks in the E. L. Dale Memorial Library Gardens just outside the Carthage Public Library last month and police are looking for clues as to who might have done it.

Vandals damaged two landmarks in the E. L. Dale Memorial Library Gardens just outside the Carthage Public Library last month and police are looking for clues as to who might have done it.
Carthage Public Library Director Julie Yockey said the “Alice In Wonderland” statue, a bronze statue created by the late Carthage Artist Bill Snow, was damaged by someone who scratched a heart into the side of the sculpture's face and made scratches in its arms and neck.
That damage to the statue probably happened on Jan. 9.
Then, on Jan. 31, someone took black lipstick or some other black marker and wrote a message on one of the concrete memorial benches around the statue.

Repairs and investigation
Yockey said Carthage Artist Larry Glaze made superficial repairs to the statue, making the damage harder to see if someone didn't know what they were looking for.
But complete repairs would require the expensive process of taking the statue down and shipping the statue back to the forge that made it.
“It makes me sad that someone would so something like this,” Yockey said. “It's insured, but it wouldn't be worth it to send it off to be fixed, especially since it's likely to happen again.”
Library staff worked to clean the message off the bench, but could not clean it completely.
Carthage Police Chief Greg Dagnan said his officers are looking at security camera video of the second incident which Yockey said captured three young people with flashlights moving around in the garden after dark.
Yockey said the video was too grainy for her to make out any details, but Dagnan said his investigators will see if it can be enhanced to reveal any useful details.
Dagnan said both incidents happened after dark.
“We'd ask that if anyone is driving by the park or anywhere, if they see something that looks out of place, please call us,” Dagnan said. “The worst that can happen is we find nothing and maybe have a pleasant conversation with the person reporting, but the best case scenario is that we find some clues to what happened.”

New traffic
Dagnan said his officers are working with Yockey to help the library staff cope with an increase in the number of young people coming to the library after school since the beginning of 2017.
Yockey said the opening of the new Carthage Intermediate Center changed school bussing patterns meaning more middle school-age students are being dropped off at the junior high, and some of them are coming to the library.
“They're coming in in groups, and we welcome them, we love to have them, as long as they follow the rules,” Yockey said. “A few of them are bringing in food and being loud, and a couple of them, when told by the staff they needed to be quiet, cussed out the staff member. There are three young people who cannot come back to the library until I talk to their parents.”
Yockey said administrators at the junior high and the Intermediate Center have been working with the library to make sure the students know the rules and know to behave.
She said the police department school resource officers are also working with the library staff to try to help deal with the issue.
“We've got some great after-school and teen programs, but some of these kids don't seem to want that,” Yockey said. “They want to use the laptops and go on social media, and that's great too, but they need to be responsible and don't bother the other patrons. The schools have been great to work with, both the middle school and junior high, but some students don't seem to care.”