With family ties to Neosho and a love for history, country western music artist Sarah Dunn has purchased the southwest corner of the Carthage Square.

With family ties to Neosho and a love for history, country western music artist Sarah Dunn has purchased the southwest corner of the Carthage Square.
The historic corner location of 401 S. Main St., is under heavy renovation and is anticipated to open this fall as a boutique.
"Sarah Dunn is also a seamstress, and when she bought the building she also bought the contents," said Perry Wiggin, of Tulsa, who helps Dunn with projects/transportation. "She plans to take the material and make dresses with it. In the back, we're hoping to have a coffee shop with WiFi, and [in the south portion] and back here will be professional offices ... There's a lot of work to do, but she's excited. She loves the Square, loves the history here – She's a Civil War history lover, and so she was excited when she saw this space was for sale."
When contacted by email, Dunn agreed she is excited about joining the Square and the Carthage community.
Wiggin said the biggest challenge with the renovation so far has been the roof. It also took hours to uncover the original tile floor at the front entrance, but that was an important characteristic to Dunn.  
"She wants to maintain and preserve the history of the building," Wiggin said of Dunn. "She's looking for photographs and newspaper clippings to frame and hang on the walls when it's finished. So far, the neighbors have been great, the city has been great to work with – you really have a great community."
Learn more about Sarah Dunn at sarahdunnband.com, and find her music videos on You Tube.

History on the Building
John Dillon was the first person to own the land in 1855. He sold the lot after the Civil War for $100. D.W. Hunt rented the wooden structure and shared the space with an attorney. The land came into Catherine Roessler's possession in 1872, and she built what was known as the Roessler Block in 1875. The iron front was put on the building with castings made at Carthage Foundry and Machine Shop.
The first tenants were the Reid & Nelson firm, but by 1884 the grocery store of J.J. Wells moved in as well as next door to the south.
In 1900, the corner building passed from the Roessler family to the W.S. Crane family, then W.C. Thomas in 1907. Within a few days, he resold it to Carthage National Bank.
This bank had been formed in 1875 as the Farmers and Drovers Bank, and was located on the west side of the Square.
In 1908, the bank re-located and the building became the headquarters for Juvenile Shoe Corp., from 1920-1924.
Then it became the College Pharmacy, and most recently had housed the Uptown Downtown upholstery service.
– Information source: Then & Now, by Sue Vandergriff