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The Carthage Press
  • Living family history on Route 66

  • Andrea Perrot had heard stories of her grandfather's great trip to America in 1933, but one picture caught her eye and she wanted to find the place her grandfather had photographed.
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  • Andrea Perrot had heard stories of her grandfather's great trip to America in 1933, but one picture caught her eye and she wanted to find the place her grandfather had photographed.
    On March 14 she got the chance and stood where her grandfather, Max Perrot, stood, at the crossroads of America, at that time the crossroads of U.S. Highways 71 and 66 in Carthage.
    "We found the spot, it's at Garrison and Central and we took a picture of me there, so that's done," Andrea Perrot said. "That photo, I found it in my grandpa's photo album and I thought wouldn't it be cool to do a then-and-now photo of the spot.
    "I don't know exactly what route he took, but obviously he went to Boulder Dam and we know he did Route 66 because he's got that photo, so from Carthage west we're now following in his footsteps."
    Perrot's grandfather apparently travels in style too.
    Andrea Perrot said he and a co-worker and friend, who both worked for McAlpine, a well-known engineering firm, crossed the Atlantic on the White Star Liner called the Majestic with their own Rolls Royce automobile and a chauffer.
    "Having arrived in New York, they started their journey for the construction site at Boulder Dam, which naturally meant going along Route 66 and through Carthage," Andrea Perrot wrote in an email to The Carthage Press. "They got to Boulder Dam and then retraced their journey, coming back to England on the Majestic again, in December the same year.
    "Grandpa Max went on to have a very successful career in civil engineering, working on some very prominent projects in the UK, meeting The Queen on several occasions such as at the official opening of the Dartford Tunnel, which goes under the River Thames."
    Andrea Perrot said Michele Hansford, with the Powers Museum in Carthage, helped her pinpoint where she needed to go to retrace her grandfather's picture.
    Andrea and five others were in the U.S. on a photo tour led by Gary Fooks, who operates a business and website http://www.fotocourses.co.uk/ out of Ringwood in England.
    The people were from all over England but they shared a passion for photography and an interest in American history and the old Mother Road.
    "It's a particular part of history, it covers the Depression, the inter-war years," Andrea Perrot said. "And I suppose it's when we saw America really come into it's own."
    "It's iconic," Fooks said. "It's one of the main road routes in the world. I think it's on the to-do lists of a lot of people in Europe."
     

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