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The Carthage Press
  • White sparrows at Red Oak II

  • A group of three birds that appear to be albino sparrows has taken up residence at Red Oak II in recent days, according to the builder of the community, Carthage Artist Lowell Davis.
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  • A group of three birds that appear to be albino sparrows has taken up residence at Red Oak II in recent days, according to the builder of the community, Carthage Artist Lowell Davis.
    The three sparrows may have been born at Red Oak II, located northeast of Carthage on Kafir Road.
    Davis said he started seeing the sparrows about a month ago and he's see three different ones at one time.
    Davis said on the Red Oak II Facebook page that he saw one albino sparrow at first before spotting a second and third sparrow in the next couple of days.
    What are they?” Davis wrote. “They are flying around with my regular chicken yard Sparrows. We caught this one in our Chicken House. I might be able to understand one Albino Sparrows but 3????Any of y'all out there know what the deal is here???”
    According to bird experts, having three albino sparrows in one place is very unusual, but possible.
    “The sparrows are all House Sparrows, if the one in the photos is any indication,” said Dr. Wesley Hochachka, assistant director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's bird population studies program. “Just as pure speculation, but if all three were siblings born this year then yeah, I could see having multiple albino birds being not at all surprising: if the albinism was the result of a parent’s gene(s) (for albinism) being passed on to offspring, and if albinism is caused by a single gene, then the odds start getting reasonable that multiple offspring could be albinistic.”

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