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The Carthage Press
  • Powers Museum Open House to feature local Civil War book

  • Carthage Press Managing Editor John Hacker will be the featured speaker at the monthly open house at Powers Museum starting at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 16 at the museum at 1617 W. Oak St.
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  • Carthage Press Managing Editor John Hacker will be the featured speaker at the monthly open house at Powers Museum starting at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 16 at the museum at 1617 W. Oak St.
    The Powers Museum holds an open house on the third Sunday of every month during the summer season.
    Hacker will speak about the new book “The Battle of Carthage 150th Anniversary Reenactment,” published by The Carthage Press and released in August.
    This hard-bound collector's book features stories and more than 120 photos from the reenactment, which was held on May 14 and 15, 2011, as well as stories from the pages of The Carthage Press and other publications about the July 5, 1861 Battle of Carthage.
    Hacker will also talk about “Spirit of Hope: The Year after the Joplin Tornado,” and “5:41: Stories from the Joplin Tornado, two books co-authored by Hacker and former Carthage Press Editor Randy Turner about the Joplin tornado on May 22, 2011.
    “Spirit of Hope” was released in June and deals with the reconstruction that took place since the tornado. “5:41” was released in August 2011 and has stories written by survivors and volunteers about their experiences during the tornado.
    Copies of all three books will be available at the open house. Cost for The Battle of Carthage book is $30; “Spirit of Hope” is $27 and “5:41” is $20. Special leather-bound editions of The Battle of Carthage book will also be available at a cost of $75.
    The Battle of Carthage
    The battle was one of the first battles of the Civil War, predating the Battle of Bull Run in Virginia by almost three weeks.
    The battle pitted 1,100 Union soldiers, mostly German volunteers from St. Louis, under the command of Col. Franz Sigel, against 6,000 soldiers with the Missouri State Guard under the command of Missouri Gov. Claiborne Fox Jackson, which was fleeing a larger Union army that had forced the governor and legislature to evacuate Jefferson City.
    The Missouri State Guard, composed of volunteers with limited training. Approximately 2,000 of the men were unarmed.
    Union soldiers marched into Carthage on July 4, 1861 and camped in the area now known as Carter Park overnight before marching north to meet the State Guard in battle near the current location of Baseline Road and Civil War Road about nine miles north of Carthage.
    Realizing he was heavily outnumbered, Sigel began a fighting retreat that lasted the entire day. Soldiers fired on each other and cannon roared on the streets of Carthage and the Carthage Square toward the end of the day on July 5, 1861.
    The final shots were exchanged near Carter Park as the Union soldiers retreated to Sarcoxie. State Guard troops set up camp on the same spot where Union soldiers camped the night before.
    Page 2 of 2 - The Reenactment
    Last year's reenactment featured 500 soldiers camping at Municipal Park, then on Saturday, May 14, both sides marched east on Oak Street.
    Soldiers fired on each other as they walked on Oak Street and 10 cannon, five on either side, dueled it out on the grounds of Central Park.
    The soldiers then dueled their way to the Carthage Square where, once again, the Missouri State Guard claimed victory.

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