|
|
|
The Carthage Press
  • Contractors to review damage

  • Contractors will gather on Thursday to get a first hand view of the damage that needs to be repaired along the Spring River near the historic Morrow Mill.
    • email print
  • Contractors will gather on Thursday to get a first hand view of the damage that needs to be repaired along the Spring River near the historic Morrow Mill. Jasper County Eastern District Commissioner Jim Honey said the site-showing for contractors interested in bidding on making repairs to the bank and removing parts of a failed dam at Morrow Mill will gather along County Road 119 just east of Carthage to look over the repairs that need to be made. Bids on the project will be due in on Aug. 28. The project calls for restoring part of the north bank of the river just upstream, or east, of the County Road 118 highway bridge. The contractor will add large rocks and a water-resistant fabric to armor the north bank against future erosion. The project also calls for the removal of some large rocks and remains of the dam to restore the original channel for the river away from the north bank. The federal Natural Resources Conservation Service is paying 75 percent of the cost of the project with Jasper County taxpayers paying 25 percent of the cost. For several years, since the failure of the dam at the historic Morrow Mill site, Spring River has been eating away at its northern bank, taking away a significant amount of private property and threatening to damage the relatively new highway bridge that carries County Road 118 over the river. At a Jasper County Commission meeting in July, Michael Malone, with the NRCS office in Springfield, said 1,400 cubic yards of heavy rock and 900 cubic yards of fill dirt will be used to rebuild the bank and armor it against future erosion. In addition, several large blocks of the failed dam will be pulled from the river, which will be shaped to restore the original flow before the dam diverted it. Portions of the original dam deemed historic will be left in place, but portions of a newer repair will be pulled out of the riverbed. In other commission news, Honey said he met with the residents of the Missouri side of the community of Opolis, located on the Kansas State line north of Asbury. Honey said the community was first platted over 120 years ago, but development has not followed the original plat, meaning homes are built where roads should be sited. He said most of the community is located on the Kansas side of State Line Road, but the problems affect about seven homes on the Missouri side of the line. He said in one case, a home has been built on land that actually belongs to the county and was intended for a county road. In another case, one person’s garage was built on another person’s property. Honey said the entire community will have to be resurveyed and the residents will pay the cost.

        calendar