Twelve years after she left Carthage to go to college, create a family and start a career, Sabrina Drackert is bringing her skills home to help promote her hometown.


 


Twelve years after she left Carthage to go to college, create a family and start a career, Sabrina Drackert is bringing her skills home to help promote her hometown.

Drackert, a 1998 graduate of Carthage High School, was introduced on Monday as the new president of the Carthage Chamber of Commerce and economic development director for the city of Carthage.

“It’s kind of unexpected,” Drackert said. “You move away and you always think, oh I’m never going to go back to my hometown, but, you know, I can’t wait to start a new life here. I think its wonderful that I have the opportunity to come back to my roots, come back to live with my parents, my sister lives here, and just to make this community better. When you grow up, you don’t know what’s going on in a community, it’s just there. Now I get to see why it’s there and how it got there and make it better for my own child.”

Jo Ann Evans, chairwoman of the Chamber’s Board of Directors, said Drackert was the choice of a committee that looked through approximately 18 resumes.

She takes over next week for current Chamber President John Bode, who said he will stay around for a couple of weeks to help Drackert get a running start.

Drackert comes from Springfield where she spent the past two years as the marketing manager in the economic development department of the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce.

Before that, she worked for two years as the business outreach coordinator for the Platte County Economic Development Council in Kansas City. She graduated from Missouri State University with a bachelors degree in marketing and minors in computer information systems and e-business.

Outgoing President Bode said this area is primed for good economic growth. He said the diversity in business and industry in Carthage has shielded it from the worst of the economic downturn. The city’s proximity to Kansas City and what will become two interstates when U.S. 71 is changed to I-49 makes it a prime market for business expansion.

“I expect this area to grow rapidly in the next 10 to 15 years,” Bode said. “You look at this economic downturn and how widespread and devastating it is and yet Carthage has lost only a few jobs. It’s not like the communities that were centered on just one industry, many of them were devastated, but when you have so much economic balance this area is primed for growth.”